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From Sage on the Stage to Guide on the Side: Google Hangout

Thursday November 11th 2014 5pm PST – 5:30pm.
Screen Shot 2014-11-16 at 6.05.03 PMJoin us as we host a discussion among Doceri teachers to explore their transition from Sage on the Stage to Guide on the Side on Google Hangout.
Doceri’s Education Advocate Jason Gilmore leads the discussion.  He’ll explore why the teachers began creating videos and using the Doceri interactive whiteboard in their classes, their progress with integrating instructional video in their classes, and the results of this transition for their students and their understanding of the material.

Teacher Feature: Rebecca DeLozier on Screencasting with Doceri

Triceratops Profile - Rebecca DeLozierName: Rebecca DeLozier

School: Lewisville High School

District: Lewisville Independent School District

State: Texas

Subject: AP Biology and Physics

Rebecca DeLozier has been flipping her AP Biology and Physics classes for several years. She has some basic advice for teachers new to creating screencasts:

1. Start Small, with a single concept or a quick compare and contrast.
2. Take your time writing out what you want it to look like, then replay the slide.

Rebecca says that the hardest thing about screencasting is the planning stage, developing a specific outline that has everything she wants to include in the video.

“It doesn’t all have to be written out explicitly first, but I do need a point-by-point list of all the examples, experiments and terms I want to discuss,” she says. “The goal is always to reduce the content down to a six- to seven-minute video.”

DeLozier ScreenshotIn future Freedom to Teach blog posts, we’ll explore Rebecca’s methods for creating AP Biology and Physics screencasts in depth. She uses different approaches for each subject.

“After I have a content list I park myself on the couch with my iPad and a stylus, and start writing and drawing out the lesson,” she says. “This includes a lot of revising on the fly, which is why I love the Doceri Timeline!”

Rebecca says the videos aren’t perfect, but neither are lectures in class. She never starts over from scratch when she stumbles or makes a mistake, she just pauses the recording in Doceri and starts again from that point.

“When I first started screencasting I would spend hours on a video,” she says. “Now, if the lesson is written in Doceri I can record, edit, and have five published in under two hours.”

Rebecca’s advice dovetails right into our philosophy – Just Start.

Creating Screencasts on the Fly

When choosing presentation technology, consider what is asked of all teachers in the classroom.

—> Teachers are asked to provide equal access to the core content to all students.

—> Teachers are expected to be clear, conisise, and engaging to their students.

—> Plus, teachers are asked to use multimodes of of instruction to support different learners.

 

In the Doceri trigonometry screencast (below) by MustangAlgebraGuru the teacher has prepared the slides of his screencast ahead of time, but records the audio “on the fly” in class. This is possible using Doceri Desktop. Just connect to your PC with your tablet, play your screencast, and press record. In the end, you end up with your entire lesson recorded.

MustangAlgebraGuru’s lessons end up only being around 8-10 min which is optimal for a lecture style lesson.

 

When presenting using Doceri a teacher adds the following assets to their practice:

—> A teacher can be mobile to roam around the room and check for understanding as they instruct.

—> The recording of the lesson allows students who have difficulty taking notes to be engaged but not lose information.

—> Administration can help a teacher improve their presenting and planning skills by watching a series of lessons rather than observing one lesson on one day.

—> AND, because lessons involve visual, audio, and (if your students solve problems on your tablet) kinesthetic you will be supporting learning styles of all types.

 

Through Doceri Desktop and the Doceri app a teacher can help make core content more accessible, more engaging, and provides the teacher with a record of their own progress in order to improve their craft.

 

Happy Halloween From Team DoSCARY!!!

Have a TERRORific Halloween!!

Doceri The Talent Integration App

How exciting can one teacher make the basic mechanics of writing seem to 7th graders with literary challenges?

The answer is the same with teaching every tedious academic skill – it’s what the teacher makes it.IMG_0766.PNG

I recently created a screencast called How to Create a Great Topic Sentence for my 7th grade Special Education RSP English intervention class. I said to myself, “Self! This is some boring subject matter by itself. Especially, because the kids have had it over and over again but still aren’t getting the concept for numerous reasons. How can I make these instructions digestible? What do I have to offer?

I answered myself with, visuals! I can draw! Illustrated instructions are what I need to offer. IKEA instructions rule over all text- based instructions every time.

I realized I wasn’t using my biggest asset and was relying on text and audio instructions. Big mistake when you have 10 kids with good cases of anxiety, ADHD, and/ or learning difficulties. So I created this visually enhanced version of a lesson that I had done before with just text. The response was overwhelmingly positive. The kids actually clapped in one class! One kid with major wiggle issues even asked to see it again!

IMG_0767

I followed up the lesson by helping the kids create a picture of a Martian alien in a flying saucer in their journals by using Doceri Desktop to step them through the drawing. One kid said, “Wait you’re going too fast!” So, I backed up the drawing and replayed it on the slow setting a few times.

Try that with an analogue whiteboard! It helps to have an image that the kids create themselves to use as inspiration for writing. Once the picture was complete we created a topic sentence on- screen together. They took the writing from there and finished a paragraph story describing the illustration.

To recap, I spiced up a drab subject for my students with an illustrated screencast that I created. The kids loved the fact that their teacher created a video that was on YouTube.

The screencast offered a visual and auditory prep for a kinesthetic activity to cement the concept. Even the hardened struggling learners softened a bit at this educational offering.

Yes – screencasts can be used for an English class. Doceri allows me to integrate my artistic talents into my academic lessons which in turn allows me to connect with my struggling students in ways I would never have imagined possible.

Hopefully, this will be the last time my students will have to suffer through the dreaded topic sentence lesson.

 

Columbia University Technology Innovation Showcase Kicks off Featuring Doceri

On October 16, the Columbia Center for New Media Teaching and Learning is launching the first in a series Innovation Showcases featuring presentations on what’s new in teaching and technology as well as fostering conversation between ed tech peers at Columbia. The first session will feature Doceri by SP Controls.

Columbia CNMTL

The CCNMTL helps integrate educational technology to everyone in the university. This year, its theme is Blended Learning.

“We feel that all classes are blended – even face-to-face classes” says Faculty Lab Manager Ellen Maleszewski. “All faculty members load their syllabi and other resources online, which means all classes have an online component.”

The October 16 Innovation Showcase is open to all the CNMTL educational technologists as well as the many other departments within the university that manage technology.

“We’re kicking off this technology symposium series with Doceri because it is a great resource for our ed tech departments to know about,” Maleszewski adds. “Doceri allows for greater mobility in the classroom and makes recording lectures very easy.”

Teacher Feature: East Bronx Academy Part 3, Kevin McCormack

In Part 3 of our three-part feature on the Doceri teachers at East Bronx Academy, music and computer science teacher Kevin McCormack explains he uses Doceri for how to videos for his students.

Kevin McCormackKevin McCormack – Music Tech and Wind Ensemble
Kevin teaches music tech and wind ensemble. This is his seventh year at East Bronx Academy.

Like fellow East Bronx Academy teachers Erick Odom and Carrie McCormack, Kevin also appreciates the freedom of movement that Doceri affords in the classroom.

The Doceri sweet spot that Kevin has found, though, has been in creating screencast videos for his students to explain the steps they need to use to complete assignments using MIXX DJ software and other online tools such as SoundCloud and Blogger.

“Because I can show the steps students need to take to complete their assignments outside of class, they can review them at any time,” explains Kevin. “When working with challenged readers, the visual and verbal explanation really helps.”

Kevin turns on Doceri’s record function as he goes through the steps with students in class, then makes the video available on his YouTube Channel.

Doceri at East Bronx Academy

In October of 2013, EBA teachers Erick Odom (social studies), Carrie McCormack (language arts) and Kevin McCormack (music) discovered Doceri through the New York Schools Gap App Challenge.

East Bronx Academy is a grade 6-12 public school in the poorest Congressional District in the United States. Over the years, various grants and gifts have equipped the school with technology including a wireless Internet infrastructure upgrade last year.

 

Read Part 1 of this Teacher Feature Series, on social studies teacher Erick Odom

Read Part 2 of this Teacher Feature Series, on language arts teacher Carrie McCormack

 

Teacher Feature: East Bronx Academy Part 2, Carrie McCormack

In Part 2 of our three-part feature on the Doceri teachers at East Bronx Academy, we look at how – in addition to the freedom to move around the classroom – Carrie McCormack is saving time and increasing engagement with her students by using live video grading.

Carrie McCormackCarrie McCormack – Language Arts
Carrie teaches 11th and 12th grade English, including AP English. She has been teaching for 20 years and is starting her eighth year at East Bronx Academy.

Carrie has experienced two big changes as a result of using Doceri. First, like fellow EBA teacher Erick Odom, she’s free to move around the classroom so she’s able to interact with and help more students one-on-one during class time.

“When a student in the back row asks if I can go over something from earlier in the lesson,” she explained, “I don’t have walk back up to the front of the room to access the projector. I can do it right from my iPad while I’m still engaged with that student. “

Because her students know they have better access to her – and she to them – it keeps everyone on their toes.

“I can snap a quick photo of a student’s work to provide an example for the class,” Carrie says. “Knowing that I can be right by their side at any time with the iPad keeps them more focused.”

Tremendous Time Savings when Grading Essays

In addition to more efficiency and better engagement in the classroom, Carrie has discovered that recording Doceri screencasts to grade her students’ essays not only saves time, but also affords the ability to give better feedback.

High school English Composition requires a lot of writing – especially the advanced placement sections. When Carrie began using Doceri for grading, she found she was able to get through more than 100 essays in less than a week. Before using Doceri, it would take at least two weeks to grade the essays in writing.

“Grading essays by recording my comments with Doceri takes me less than a half the time as it has in the past, when I wrote out all the comments,” Carrie says. “It’s also more personal. I can explain more, and provide the inflection in my comments and corrections to encourage students and explain how to improve their writing.”

Doceri at East Bronx Academy

In October of 2013, EBA teachers Erick Odom (social studies), Carrie McCormack (language arts) and Kevin McCormack (music) discovered Doceri through the New York Schools Gap App Challenge.

East Bronx Academy is a grade 6-12 public school in the poorest Congressional District in the United States. Over the years, various grants and gifts have equipped the school with technology including a wireless Internet infrastructure upgrade last year.

 

Read Part 1 of this Teacher Feature Series, on social studies teacher Erick Odom

Read Part 3 of this Teacher Feature Series, on music teacher Kevin McCormack

 

Teacher Erick Odom Here

Teacher Feature: East Bronx Academy Part 1, Erick Odom

East Bronx Academy is a grade 6-12 public school in the poorest Congressional District in the United States. Over the years, various grants and gifts have equipped the school with technology including a wireless Internet infrastructure upgrade last year.

In October of 2013, EBA teachers Erick Odom (social studies), Carrie McCormack (language arts) and Kevin McCormack (music) discovered Doceri through the New York Schools Gap App Challenge.

This series explores how these three teachers have implemented Doceri in their classrooms.

Erick_Odom_East_Bronx_AcademyErick Odom – social studies

Erick teaches US History, Economics and American Government, AP Government and a Legal Studies elective. He’s been teaching for ten years; this is his 7th year at East Bronx Academy.

The biggest difference in Erick’s classroom now that he uses Doceri, is that he can walk around and interact with students more closely while he’s giving a lesson, keeping tabs on students more closely.

“Normally, when lecturing from the front of the room, teachers can’t tell that a student is having trouble understanding the material until their homework is turned in – and then it’s too late,” he explains. “Using Doceri I can move around among my students, create a more interactive lesson and correct misconceptions as they happen.”

Accessing his classroom computer wirelessly from his iPad using Doceri, Erick not only has access to all of his files and materials, he can also remotely project presentations, images and websites for the class and annotate them as he moves around the room. He can take a picture of a student’s work with the iPad camera, import it to Doceri and project it for the class as an example.

“My students love the ‘new projector’ as they call it, and have been more eager to share their work using the classroom iPad,” Erick says.

Erick also creates Doceri screencasts for test prep and when students are absent, so they can catch up quickly. Students who don’t have computers and Internet access at home can use school facilities to watch the screencast lesson videos.

 

Read Part 2 of this Teacher Feature Series, on language arts teacher Carrie McCormack

Read Part 3 of this Teacher Feature Series, on music teacher Kevin McCormack

 

Back to School Twitter Chat Sept. 18, 2014

Untitled 35Doceri Chat is back!

Doceri Education Community Advocate Jason Gilmore will facilitate a Back to School edition of Doceri Chat on Thursday Sept. 18 at 5pm Pacific, 6pm Mountain, 7pm Central, 8pm Eastern.

What are your goals for Doceri in your Classroom this year?

Join us on for Doceri Chat on Twitter to share and discuss with other Doceri teachers. Use the hashtag #DoceriChat to follow along and participate.

We highly recommend using TweetChat to get the most out of participating in a Twitter Chat.

This Doceri Screencast Explains how to participate and how to use TweetChat. We’ll see you Thursday September 18!